Resources for Family Members, FRIENDS, AND COWORKERS

You're not a trained professional, and you're not responsible for saving others. But you can help point them in the right direction. If they're a union member, help can be found here. Publicly available resources can be found here.

WHEN I FEEL RESPONSIBLE TO OTHERS...

  • I empathize
  • I encourage
  • I support
  • I confront
  • I acknowledge their feelings
  • I am sensitive
  • I feel relaxed
  • I feel free
  • I feel secure
  • I feel confident

I AM CONCERNED WITH:

  • relating
  • feelings
  • the person

I EXPECT THE PERSON TO BE RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR OWN ACTIONS.

I AM A HELPER-GUIDE. I BELIEVE IF I JUST SHARE MYSELF, THE OTHER PERSON HAS ENOUGH TO MAKE IT.

WHEN I FEEL RESPONSIBLE FOR OTHERS...

  • I fix
  • I protect
  • I rescue
  • I control
  • I carry their feelings
  • I don't listen
  • I feel tired
  • I feel anxious
  • I feel fearful
  • I feel guilty

I AM CONCERNED WITH:

  • the solution
  • answers
  • being right
  • details

I EXPECT THE PERSON TO LIVE UP TO MY EXPECTATIONS.

I MANIPULATE OR TRY TO CONTROL.

 

If you're a family member to someone in one of British Columbia's motion picture industry unions, you may also have access to help through the union's Employee and Family Assistance or Member and Family Assistance Program. Find yours here.


I SUSPECT SOMEONE I KNOW MAY HAVE A SUBSTANCE ABUSE ISSUE. WHAT DO I DO?

  • Know the signs of substance abuse
  • Know how to recognize and respond to an overdose
  • ASSESS: Does this person exhibit unusual behaviour? Do they seem unable to focus or perform normal tasks? Has their behaviour or personal hygiene changed? Are they in immediate danger of doing harm to themselves or others? (If yes, call 911 immediately.)
  • LISTEN, and TALK: Ask if they're okay. Let them know you've noticed changes in their behaviour or appearance, and that you're there to listen if they need to talk. Let them know you're concerned about substance abuse.
  • GIVE HOPE AND REASSURANCE: Let them know that they are not alone, and that help is available.
  • ENCOURAGE INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL SUPPORTS: Is there a family member or a doctor you can contact? Let them know their union provides support through their Member or Employee Assistance Program and that the support is confidential. Even the union staff do not know when a member has accessed the services available.
  • If appropriate, contact their union or guild. We can help with referrals to substance abuse professionals.

I SUSPECT SOMEONE I KNOW MAY HAVE A MENTAL HEALTH ISSUE. WHAT DO I DO?

Similar to dealing with a substance abuse issue, above:

  • Know the signs of mental health issues including: 
  • ASSESS: Does this person exhibit unusual behaviour? Has there been a gradual or sudden change in their ability to perform their usual tasks? Has there been a change in their personal hygiene? If they seem in immediate danger of doing harm to themselves or others, call 911 immediately.
  • LISTEN, and TALK: Ask if they're okay. Let them know you've noticed changes in their behaviour or appearance, and that you're there to listen if they need to talk. Let them know you're concerned about their health.
  • GIVE HOPE AND REASSURANCE: Let them know they are not alone, that there is help available.
  • ENCOURAGE INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL SUPPORTS: Is there a family member or a doctor you can contact? Let them know their union provides support through their Member or Employee Assistance Program and that the support is confidential. Even the union staff do not know when a member has accessed the support available.
  • If appropriate, contact their union. We can help with referrals to mental health professionals.

OTHER RESOURCES AND SUGGESTIONS: